Wednesday, 21 Nov 2018

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Anxiety and Depression are Common in Arthritis Patients

The high prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression among adults with arthritis warrants awareness, screening, and subsequent treatment of these conditions. Health care providers can refer patients to mental health professionals and self-management education programs, and encourage physical activity to reduce anxiety and depression symptoms and improve quality of life.

RheumNow Week in Review – Vitamin D Falls Again (10.4.18)

Dr. Jack Cush reviews the news from the past week on RheumNow.com. 

Vitamin D Fails to Improve Bone Health

The current edition of Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology suggests that neither vitamin D supplementation, nor dose, will improve bone density or prevent fractures in adults. (Citation source: https://buff.ly/2O9tqxI)

Activity Trackers May be Helpful in Arthritis Patients

Use of wearable activity trackers was associated with increases in the number of daily steps among individuals with rheumatic and musculoskeletal disorders, a meta-analysis found.

Predictive Risk Factors for Uveitis in JIA

Researchers from Germany have studied a large cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and shown that JIA disease activity scores and laboratory biomarkers could be used to better define the group of JIA patients at high risk of uveitis onset.

Zolendronic Acid Benefits Elder Women with Osteopenia

The NEJM reports that zolendronic acid was shown to significantly lower the risk of nonvertebral or vertebral fragility fractures in older women with osteopenia. 

Excess Mortality in CTD or Systemic Vasculitis Patients

The Norwegian connective tissue disease (CTD) and systemic vasculitis (PSV) registry (NOSVAR) studied patient outcomes over a 15 year period and found overall mortality to be higher in the CTD compared to the PSV group.

Elder Rheumatoids Less Likely to Receive Biologics

Multiple studies have shown that elderly rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients tend to be under-treated and receive DMARD therapies less often than younger RA patients. Now a VAMC study shows that the elderly are less likely to receive biologic agents yet are as likely to be subjected to glucocorticoid use.

Does Gender Make a Difference in Axial Spondyloarthritis

Males and females can both be affected by axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). A recent study shows that while there are some differences and similarities, HLA-B27 and imaging are still pivotal elements for diagnosis of axSpA in both genders.

Long-Term Efficacy of Canakinumab in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Only inhibitors of IL-1 (canakinumab) and IL-6 (tocilizumab) are FDA approved for use in children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Now, long-term data from the extension studies from two phase III studies shows that canakinumab yields long-term improvements with reduced glucocorticoid dosing with no new safety findings with long-term use.

Defining Refractory Rheumatoid Arthritis

Researchers from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics (BSRBR) set out to define under what circumstances will rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients manifest biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) refractory disease.

Using the patients from the BSRBR Register (2001 to 2014) they defined patients as bDMARD refractory when they initiated their third class of bDMARD.

Neuropathic Like Knee Pain

Fernandez and colleagues have shed further light on a significant subset of patients with knee pain - specifically, those with neuropathic like knee pain (NKP) that includes those with knee pain modified by central and peripheral neurologic dysfunction.