Friday, 15 Dec 2017

News

The RheumNow Week in Review - 3 November 2017

Dr. Jack Cush reviews the news and highlights from the past week on RheumNow.com. Hear about death and risk of lupus, tight control in Crohn's, risk of knee OA, new diagnostic tool for PMR, keeping infections low with biologics and new shingles vaccine, and infection concerns for San Diego.

CALM Study: Tight Control with Anti-TNF Wins in Crohn's Disease

Not unlike rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders, therapeutic efficacy in Crohn's disease (CD) is often assessed clinically. There is growing use and interest in biomarkers of intestinal inflammation, such as faecal calprotectin and C-reactive protein. But Lancet has now reported a clinical trial has shown that a tight control strategy can yield better responses to TNF inhibitors when compared to usual care. 

NSAID and Opioid Adverse Event Reports from MedWatch

One-third of adults in the USA experience chronic pain and take prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, or opioids. This report from the MedWatch system shows that 20% of reports were associated with death, with near equal contribution by NSAIDs, opioids and combination (NSAIDs plus opioids).

Tocilizumab Benefits Persist in SSc

Clinically meaningful improvements in systemic sclerosis among patients treated with subcutaneous tocilizumab (Actemra) persisted during the open-label phase of a multinational randomized phase II trial, researchers reported.

High Volume Lyme Disease Reporting in Low Incidence Arkansas

Even though Arkansas lies on the edge of the geographic range of the principal Lyme disease tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, the risk for Lyme infection is low, and no confirmed Lyme disease cases were reported in Arkansas during 2008–2014 (1)

New EULAR/ACR Classification Criteria for Adult and Juvenile Myositis

The European League Against Rheumatism and the American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) have developed classification criteria for idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) based on data from 976 IIM patients (74% adults; 26% children) and 624 non-IIM patients with mimicking conditions (82% adults; 18% children) from 47 rheumatology, dermatology, neurology and paediatric clinics worldwide. 

Death Rates from Lupus Remain Disproportionately High

The Annals of Internal Medicine reports that despite improving trends in mortality, death rates from systematic lupus erythematosus (lupus) remain high compared to those in the general population, and disparities persist between subpopulations and geographic regions. Underreporting of lupus on death certificates may have resulted in underestimates of mortality rates. 

Necroptosis Drives Netosis and ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

PNAS reports that ANCA induced neutrophil activation, generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETS), and vasculitis are regulated by necroptosis. Using inhibitors of necroptosis-inducing kinases they were able to prevent ANCA associated vasculitis (AAV) in animal models. 

CRIB Study Shows No Transplacental Transfer of Certolizumab

Mariette and colleagues have reported on the prospective pharmacokinetic study of placental transfer of certolizumab pegol (CZP) from pregnant women to their infants at the time of birith. They found no to minimal CZP in infant blood at the time of delivery, suggesting a lack of in utero fetal exposure during the third trimester.

CDC Endorses New Shingles Vaccine Over Zostavax

The  U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced on 25 October they endorsed the use of the new GSK shingles vaccine (Shingrix) over the currently available live-virus vaccine (Zostavax) from Merck. 

The RheumNow Week in Review - 27 October 2017

The RheumNow Week in Review discusses the past week's news, journal articles and highlights from RheumNow.com. In this week's report, Dr. Jack Cush discusses weight loss and nonadherence in gout, tofacitinib and atherosclerosis, new FDA approvals for PsA and AS, and biosimilar savings ahead.

The Greatest Rheumatologist - Part II

Wow! I hope you read part I of yesterday's “Greatest Rheumatologist” article.  So many big names and yet, other names and stories that were equally inspirational.

If you read the comments of the part I article you can clearly see several themes emerge.