Friday, 20 Apr 2018

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Cannibis Weakly Effective in Neuropathic Pain

The medical use of cannabis is often extended to management of chronic pain and neuropathic pain.

A metanalysis of 27 chronic pain trials show that there is low-strength evidence that cannabis alleviates neuropathic pain but insufficient evidence in other pain populations.

However, there was little evidence that cannabis can alleviate pain associated with multiple sclerosis, cancer, or rheumatic conditions.  

Among these 11 systematic reviews and 32 primary studies there was evidence of cannabis-associated increased risks for motor vehicle accidents, psychotic symptoms, and short-term cognitive impairment, especially in older populations.

Instead of pain benefits, existing evidence suggests that cannabis is associated with an increased risk for adverse physical and mental health effects.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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