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CDC: 40% of U.S Adults Claim to Have Arthritis

The CDC has reported its 2013 and 2014 prevalence statistics for arthritis and other chronic medical conditions affecting U.S. adults aged ≥18 years. Data is drawn from the ongoing Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based, telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults. Data herein is self-reported arthritis (OA, RA, Gout, FM) and is quantified by state and metropolitan areas.

They estimate that In 2013 and 2014, approximately 40% of adults aged ≥45 years had some form of arthritis in each year, with a range of 30.6%–51%.

Arthritis was defined as respondents aged ≥45 years who reported having ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional they have some form of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. In 2013, age-adjusted prevalence estimates of arthritis among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 30.6% in Hawaii to 51.0% in West Virginia (median: 39.4%) (Table 45). Among selected metropolitan areas, age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 27.6% in Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas, to 52.4% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 39.4%).

In 2014, age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 31.2% in Hawaii to 54.7% in West Virginia (median: 39.8%) (Table 47). Among selected MMSA, age-adjusted prevalence ranged from 28.4% in College Station-Bryan, Texas, to 54.7% in Montgomery, Alabama (median: 40.1%).

TABLE 45Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who have ever been told by a health professional they have some form of arthritis,by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2013

State/TerritorySample
size
%SE95% CI
Alabama4,97648.81.0(46.9–50.7)
Alaska2,78638.61.3(36.0–41.3)
Arizona3,11239.01.5(36.1–41.9)
Arkansas4,00643.71.1(41.5–45.8)
California7,15035.90.8(34.3–37.4)
Colorado9,38936.50.6(35.3–37.7)
Connecticut5,43237.20.9(35.4–38.9)
Delaware3,75540.31.1(38.3–42.4)
District of Columbia3,54235.91.2(33.6–38.1)
Florida26,50637.60.7(36.3–39.0)
Georgia5,54840.40.9(38.7–42.1)
Hawaii5,12630.61.0(28.7–32.5)
Idaho3,96037.91.1(35.8–40.0)
Illinois3,97739.41.1(37.3–41.5)
Indiana7,48542.60.7(41.3–44.0)
Iowa6,02336.90.8(35.4–38.4)
Kansas16,43737.40.4(36.6–38.3)
Kentucky8,06046.20.9(44.5–47.9)
Louisiana3,97641.01.2(38.8–43.3)
Maine6,11842.40.8(40.8–44.0)
Maryland9,55238.20.7(36.9–39.6)
Massachusetts10,63638.00.7(36.6–39.4)
Michigan9,12446.30.7(45.0–47.7)
Minnesota9,91231.00.9(29.2–32.9)
Mississippi5,60345.91.0(44.0–47.8)
Missouri5,19642.81.0(40.7–44.8)
Montana6,83739.00.8(37.4–40.7)
Nebraska12,40039.00.7(37.6–40.3)
Nevada3,49533.11.4(30.3–35.8)
New Hampshire4,82339.70.9(37.9–41.4)
New Jersey8,73035.00.7(33.6–36.5)
New Mexico6,44537.80.9(36.1–39.5)
New York5,78339.70.8(38.0–41.3)
North Carolina6,17940.70.8(39.1–42.4)
North Dakota5,42940.10.9(38.3–41.8)
Ohio8,60843.40.8(41.9–44.9)
Oklahoma5,94240.60.8(39.0–42.1)
Oregon4,32040.00.9(38.2–41.9)
Pennsylvania8,10343.20.7(41.8–44.6)
Rhode Island4,72941.30.9(39.6–43.0)
South Carolina7,81844.80.8(43.2–46.4)
South Dakota4,71938.31.2(35.9–40.7)
Tennessee4,25439.81.1(37.6–41.9)
Texas7,21135.50.9(33.7–37.2)
Utah7,53335.90.7(34.6–37.3)
Vermont4,72140.30.9(38.7–42.0)
Virginia5,80040.20.8(38.5–41.8)
Washington7,99541.00.7(39.6–42.5)
West Virginia4,14751.00.9(49.2–52.8)
Wisconsin4,68738.01.1(35.8–40.2)
Wyoming4,99638.30.9(36.5–40.0)
Guam81032.02.2(27.7–36.2)
Puerto Rico4,01139.01.0(37.1–40.8)
Median 39.4  
Range 30.6–51.0  

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
 Including arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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