Wednesday, 17 Oct 2018

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Mayo and UAB Awarded $1 million Grant for Patient Research

CreakyJoints and Pfizer have selected the Mayo Clinic and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) to each receive a $500K research award (funded by Pfizer Independent Grants) for Learning & Change.

Grants submitted from both centers haved focused on shared decision making between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and health care providers.

The Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), lead by John M. Davis, III, MD, as the principal investigator,  for the first project titled, “The Impact of Arthritis Power on Rheumatoid Arthritis Shared Decision Making.” The objective is to improve shared decision making about treatment options and thereby enhance disease outcomes and health-related quality of life for RA patients. Data will be collected using the Creaky Joints "ArthritisPower" mobile application.

The UAB project, lead by principal investigator Huifeng Yun, PhD, is titled, “Integration of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) and Electronic Health Records (EHR) to Improve Shared Decision Making in Rheumatoid Arthritis.” This study will integrate individual patient reported outcomes (PRO) data collected from ArthritisPower with clinical and laboratory data from Electronic Health Records (EHR).

“We created ArthritisPower because we believe that patients should always be at the center of RA treatment decision-making. These projects rely on information coming directly from patients outside of the clinical setting to take into account patient preferences about medication efficacy and risks, and quality of life indicators that are important to people living with arthritis,” stated Seth Ginsberg, President and Co-Founder of Global Healthy Living Foundation and CreakyJoints. “We’re thrilled that Mayo and UAB will use ArthritisPower to inform their studies and add to our understanding of how arthritis patients think about their symptoms and treatment, and also how they use technology to communicate this information to their health care providers.”

ArthritisPower was created by CreakyJoints and supported by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). ArthritisPower is a patient-centered research registry for joint, bone, and inflammatory skin conditions. To learn more and join ArthritisPower, visit www.ArthritisPower.org.

 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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