Monday, 23 Jul 2018

You are here

Obesity, Hypertension and Diuretics Drive Gout Risk

A recent metanalysis suggests that obesity, hypertension and diuretic use are associated with a two-fold increased risk of incident gout.

From a potential of 9923 articles, researchers analyzed 11 studies with data suitable for the meta-analysis.

Gout was 2.24 times more likely to occur in individuals with body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 (adjusted relative risk 2.24 (95% confidence interval) 1.76–2.86).

Hypertensive individuals were 1.64 (1.34–2.01) and 2.11 (1.64–2.72) times more likely to develop gout as normotensive individuals.

Diuretic use was associated with almost 2.5 times the risk of developing gout compared to no diuretic use (adjusted relative risk 2.39 (1.57–3.65)).

Identification of at risk individuals for gout can be enhanced by close monitoring of those with obesity, hypertension or diuretic use.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Immunophysiology of the Gout Attack

Gout may be an ancient disease, with arthritis of the big toe having been described in Egypt in 2,600 BC, but only now are the underlying pathophysiologic events being elucidated and understood.

Public Citizen Pressures FDA to Pull Febuxostat

Public Citizen has petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to remove Takeda's drug febuxostat (Uloric) from the market, citing the FDA's own warnings and evidence of serious cardiovascular harms. This follows on a recent FDA safety warning and NEJM paper citing cardiovascular concerns over febuxostat.

Gout Takeaways

The annual EULAR meeting just came to an end today. Rooms are gradually emptying out. People look both content to have updated their knowledge and relieved that four very busy days have concluded. Time to summarize.

Sons of Gout Study

The genetics and heritability of gout has suggested a higher risk in certain families.  A UK cohort study examined the prevalence of gout and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition among those at risk (sons of gout patients) for gout and found a high incidence of hyperuricemia and MSU crystal deposition.

The Hazardous Highs and Lows of Uric Acid

Both high and low levels of uric acid were linked with increased risks of death, showing a U-shaped association between serum uric acid levels and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality, Korean researchers reported.