Tuesday, 15 Oct 2019

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Hydroxychloroquine Blood Levels May Predict Future Retinopathy

A study of 527 patients receiving daily hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) concluded that hydroxychloroquine blood levels may predict future HCQ retinopathy.

This study assessed whether lower HCQ dosing, as recommended by the 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) guidelines (less than 5 mg/kg), would favorably affect retinopathy outcomes.

Juvenile Arthritis at Risk for Coronary Artery Disease

Arthritis Care & Research reports that juvenile arthritis (JA) patients may have a higher risk if coronary artery disease (CAD) in adulthood. 

Data was drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination (2007‐2014).  The diagnoses of JA and CAD were self declared by respondents.

RheumNow Podcast – When You’re Hot You’re Hot (10.11.19)

Dr. Jack Cush delivers select commentary on select news and journal articles from the past week on RheumNow.com.

Long Delays for Inflammatory Arthritis Patients

The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society's (NRAS) annual audit has identified significant treatment delays for patients with suspected early inflammatory arthritis could result in unnecessary harm. 

Sprifermin Benefits Cartilage Loss but not Symptoms in Knee Osteoarthritis

Intra-articular sprifermin given to patients with symptomatic and radiographic knee osteoarthritis has been shown to significantly improve total femorotibial joint cartilage thickness after 2 years, but without significant clinical benefits. Which begs the question, why is there a disconnect between radiographic disease modification (cartilage thickness) and symptomatic improvement?
Sponsored by AbbVie
In this video, Dr. Roy Fleischmann discusses data from the SELECT-COMPARE trial with RINVOQ™ (upadacitinib).
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Since moving to South Florida (also popularly known as "God's Waiting Room" by the locals). I've learned a lot more about Lipstick Rheumatology. This moniker was made famous by my friend and colleague, Dr. Kathryn Dao, who first wrote about the nuances of being a female with rheumatic disease. This blog focuses on three popular products recommended by my female patients that serve as life improving hacks.
A water pipe in my house broke, and I had to call for emergency plumbing service. The next day I went to the hospital, where I was on my two weeks of General Medicine inpatient attending. An elderly man was admitted, cared for, and following this patient's successful hospital discharge several days later, something occurred to me.
After a few clinic no-shows, our clinic partner discussions lapsed into a discussion of clinics, especially bad clinics. Amidst the cussing and discussing of clinic experience, my partner, Dr. Dao, threw out the phrase, “clinic exorcism”! What a great title for a different kind of blog. When clinic operations and operators are truly bad, who you gonna call? Not Clinic Busters. Think about clinic exorcisms designed to eradicate potentially hazardous patients, employees, partners or certain clinic practices.
How do you help your patients who are resistant to your medical recommendations when they are receiving biased information from friends, family, and the internet? I wanted to share with you two cases and my approach.
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When treating a patient for GCA, when might you add a steroid-sparing agent?
Riociquat in Scleroderma ILD
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Adverse Effects of Newer Agents 2019

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