Tuesday, 25 Sep 2018

News

Febuxostat (IR or XR) Effective in Gout with Renal Impairment

Saag and colleagues report the results of a 3 month phase III trial demonstrating equal efficacy between febuxostat extended release (XR) and immediate release (IR) formulations in patients with gout.  and normal or impaired renal function.

Big Advances for Two Osteoporosis Drugs

New developments with the FDA and new scientific findings are adding momentum to two drugs experts believe are game-changers in osteoporosis treatment.

In May, the FDA approved denosumab (Prolia) for use in patients who have glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and are at high risk of fracture. 

Back Pain in Psoriatic Arthritis

A single center study of psoriatic arthritis patients has shown that rheumatologist-judged inflammatory back pain (IBP) and criteria defining IBP may not perform well when ascertaining axial involvement in PsA patients. 

Higher Infection Rates for Infliximab in Psoriasis

A prospective study of psoriasis patients from the British Association of Dermatologists Biologic Interventions Register demonstrated that infliximab therapy yielded 2-3 times more serious infection than seen in those treated with non-biologic DMARDs or methotrexate (MTX).

The RheumNow Week in Review – Handshakes or Hugs (8.3.18)

Dr. Jack Cush reviews the news and highlights from the past week on RheumNow.com, including new treatments for LTBI, gout consequences, RA and offspring risk, PsA risk, and the opioid epidemic effects.

Maternal RA Increases Offspring Risk of Autoimmune Disorders

A Danish population study suggests that fetal exposure to maternal rheumatoid arthritis results in an increased offspring risk of thyroid disease, epilepsy and RA, compared to children born to mothers without RA.

Ethnicity Matters in Sjogren's Syndrome

Among the ethnically diverse residents of Manhattan, certain groups had markedly different incidence rates of primary Sjogren's syndrome, a retrospective study found.

Women were more often affected, with age-adjusted incidence rates being highest for Asian women, at 10.5 (95% CI 6.6-15.7) per 100,000 person-years, according to Peter M. Izmirly, MD, of New York University School of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues.

Opioid Aversion is Augmenting Spinal Steroid Injections

As physicians turn away from opioids, are they resorting to options that may also be unsafe?

The New York Times reports that some physicians are using the anti-inflammatory drug, Depo-Medrol, for intraspinal injections to manage painful spinal and perispinal disorders.

IL-1 Suppression May Improve Dilated Cardiomyopathy

 

Interleukin-1 (IL-1) suppression helped reverse symptoms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) for one patient in a case study that may implicate inflammation in the development of the condition.

Company Payments to Rheumatologists, Specialists Linked to Increased ACTH Prescriptions

Despite its exorbitant price tag and paucity of supportive clinical evidence, ACTH (corticotropin) sales have increased in the United States. A recent JAMA article examined its use by specialists and found that those who prescribe ACTH (including rheumatologists, nephrologists, neurologists) received corticotropin-related payments from the products sole manufacturer, Mallinckrod.

Statin Associated with an Increase in Inflammatory Myopathy

JAMA Internal Medicine reports that exposure to statin medications may be linked to histologically confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

A population-based, case-control study, using the South Australian Myositis Database, examined 221 patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis (IIM) matched 1:3 with 662 controls. The 221 IIM cases had a mean age of 62.2 years, and 132 (59.7%) were female

Type I Interferon Drives Photosensitivity in Cutaneous Lupus

Kahlenberg and coworkers have reported in ARD that interferon kappa (IFN-κ) is a key regulator of type I interferon (IFN) photosensitive responses in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE).