Friday, 19 Oct 2018

Today's Headlines

Nurse Led Gout Management Highly Effective

UK researchers have shown that nurse-led gout management, using a treat-to-target urate-lowering strategy, is efficacious and cost-effective compared with usual physicain care. The results are published in the recent Lancet edition.

Worldwide, gout management is suboptimal. In the UK only 40% of gout patients receive urate-lowering therapy, and fewer ever achieve a target serum urate (< 6mg/d) concentration.

It's the Genes, Not the Diet that Raises Urate

Researchers from New Zealand find that in contrast with genetic contributions, diet explains very little variation in serum urate levels in the general population.

NEJM Debate on Medical Marijuana for Chronic Pain

This week’s NEJM features a case discussion and debate over whether medical marijuana should be used to treat chronic pain. The debate focuses on a 31-year-old woman with long-standing complex regional pain syndrome in her leg and foot. CRPS followed a sports related hairline fracture in the right fibula. Her pain has been intractable since.

Update on Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Toxicity

JAMA has a 2018 update/review of the safety issues seen with mmune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) - important new cancer therapies, with 14 cancer indications, that have significantly improved survival in several. ICIs are monoclonal antibodies that block inhibitors of T-cell activation and function.

Apremilast Succeeds in Scalp Psoriasis

Celgene has announced results from the phase 3 STYLE study, showing apremilast yielding significant improvement in moderate-to-severe scalp psoriasis. STYLE is a phase 3, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study evaluating the efficacy and safety of apremilast in subjects with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis of the scalp. The study enrolled 303 people who were randomized 2:1 to receive apremilast 30 mg twice daily or placebo for the first 16 weeks.

IL-6 for Adult Still's: A New Option?

Some clinical benefits were seen among patients with adult-onset Still's disease treated with tocilizumab (Actemra) in a small clinical trial, but the study's primary endpoint was not met, Japanese researchers reported.

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My typically pleasant 76 year old male was livid when I walked into the exam room.

I recently heard of a secondary school assignment wherein students were challenged to “bury” a word that was no longer useful or appropriate. Their exercise has now evolved into an unofficial RheumNow task force to retire diagnostic terms that have grown into misuse in rheumatology and medicine. How did we decide which words should perish? And by what criteria? Who has the final say?
As the healthcare landscape continues to change, “no show” rates will be an important factor for clinical practice. Implementing even one or two of the following proposed changes may help improve your no show rates.
By recognizing the limitations of memory and patient recall, I tend to focus historic elements that have high predictive value and avoid time consuming worm-holes in history-taking that have low predictive value. This leaves me with more time to listen to the patient.
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Dr. Olga Petryna at EULAR 2018 - Biologics Don't Affect Infection with Arthroplasty
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