Wednesday, 15 Aug 2018

Today's Headlines

Persistent Osteoporosis Drug Use Pays Off

Among elderly female Medicare patients, persistent use of osteoporosis medications was associated with reduced risk of fracture and significantly lower total health care costs.

Osteoporosis International reports the results of research examining records of 294,369 women >65 years old, on Medicare and taking osteoporosis medicines for the first time at some point between 2009 and 2011. (Citation Source: bit.ly/2vALm98) 

U.S. News 2018-19 Rheumatology Rankings

The Annual U.S. News and World Report Rankings of Hospitals has listed the top contenders in the field of rheumatology. The U.S. News Review rates hospitals nationwide in 16 specialties – including rheumatology. Of the 4,500 hospitals covered by U.S. News that were analyzed, 158 were classified nationally in at least one specialty area.

Success of Stopping Depends on the Biologic

The type of biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) being used and remission duration were important factors predicting whether remission was maintained among patients with rheumatoid arthritis after cessation of the biologic, a Japanese study found.

Cardiovascular Benefits of Maintaining Biologic Therapy

An Australian prospective study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has shown that sustained use of tumour necrosis factor (TNFi) inhibitors or biologics can reduce the risks of cardiovascular events (CVEs).

The RheumNow Week in Review – No Good Gout (8.10.18)

Dr. Jack Cush reviews the news and latest journal articles from the past week on RheumNow.com. Info on Surgery and Hip Fractures, Gout drugs abandoned, Allopurinol escalation, hydroxychloroquine drug levels, how to treat scleroderma in India and exactly who gets back pain.

Fractures Augment 10 Year Mortality Risks

This nationwide study of adults (50+ yrs) from Denmark has shown that following a fragility fracture, the 10-years mortality risk was increased, especially in the first year following the fracture. 

Sponsored Content
RA is an autoimmune disease driven by self-perpetuating central pathways, involving B-cell–derived autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines. Disease progression is driven by a range of immune cells that include T cells, B cells, and macrophages.
BLOG
By recognizing the limitations of memory and patient recall, I tend to focus historic elements that have high predictive value and avoid time consuming worm-holes in history-taking that have low predictive value. This leaves me with more time to listen to the patient.
The word “access” is thrown around a lot these days, particularly regarding health care and specifically, prescription medications. Access to medications essentially revolves around two things: availability and affordability. Immediately, pharmaceutical manufacturers come to mind, as they are responsible for production and setting the list price. However, ultimate availability and affordability of medications is shared with another entity. The final arbiter of access is the Pharmacy Benefit Manager. Their power resides in the fact that they control the formulary and determine the “preferred drugs” list. How does this relate to the uptake of biosimilars?

The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a common disorder affecting patients with and without autoimmune disease. Despite wider recognition of APS among physicians as well as the expanding research collaborations, many clinical questions are still encountered in clinical practice, which require further evidence-based studies. In this “Across the Table” edition, Drs. Cush and Erkan discuss some of these APS-related questions. Our guest expert, Dr. Doruk Erkan offers up his approach to diagnosis and management of APS.

A new patient came in today; he noted that he made an appointment with me after reading a favorab

Everyone gets their education about drug-related infection risk from television ads. Rheumatologists should know what the real risks are and educate their patients that they have a higher than normal rate of nonserious infections. But the infection risk is way more related to inflammation than any specific drug risk.

Dr. Jack Cush at EULAR 2018 onAnakinra in Pseudogout
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