Friday, 21 Sep 2018

Today's Headlines

Maastricht Study Links Dairy Intake to Osteoarthritis

The Maastricht study explored the potential association between dairy consumption and knee osteoarthritis (OA), and found that higher intake of full-fat dairy and Dutch cheese - but not milk - was significantly associated with the lower risk of knee OA.

Unproven But Profitable Stem Cell Clinics

Stem cell clinics are popular and proliferating as they are largely a cash business and fall outside of FDA regulatory control. In lieu of scientific proof, most advocates use patient testimonials and the placebo effect to back up their claims.

Treat-to-Target in RA: No Increase in AEs

Implementing a treat-to-target approach for the care of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) did not result in an increase in adverse events or resource use, a post-hoc analysis of a randomized trial showed.

An Association between GCA and IBD ?

A population based analysis from Israel suggests that giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients may be at increased risk for  inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) mainly target.

This research was based on sporadic reports in the medical literature (http://bit.ly/2pnIPM0)

FDA's Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) Finalized

In response to the growing opioid crisis, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved the final Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS), designed to reduce the risk of abuse, misuse, addiction, overdose, and deaths due to prescription opioid analgesics.

Breast Implant Study: More Worries or Not?

The Annals of Surgery reports on an anlaysis of FDA-mandated postmarket studies, including nearly 100,000 breast implant pprocedures, that showed silicone implants to be associated with higher rates of  Sjögren's syndrome, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, stillbirth, and melanoma.

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The RA Redefined video matrix aims to educate on the evolving understanding behind the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the role of autoantibodies and cytokines in the disease, and how T cells and B cells perpetuate RA.
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I recently heard of a secondary school assignment wherein students were challenged to “bury” a word that was no longer useful or appropriate. Their exercise has now evolved into an unofficial RheumNow task force to retire diagnostic terms that have grown into misuse in rheumatology and medicine. How did we decide which words should perish? And by what criteria? Who has the final say?
As the healthcare landscape continues to change, “no show” rates will be an important factor for clinical practice. Implementing even one or two of the following proposed changes may help improve your no show rates.
By recognizing the limitations of memory and patient recall, I tend to focus historic elements that have high predictive value and avoid time consuming worm-holes in history-taking that have low predictive value. This leaves me with more time to listen to the patient.
The word “access” is thrown around a lot these days, particularly regarding health care and specifically, prescription medications. Access to medications essentially revolves around two things: availability and affordability. Immediately, pharmaceutical manufacturers come to mind, as they are responsible for production and setting the list price. However, ultimate availability and affordability of medications is shared with another entity. The final arbiter of access is the Pharmacy Benefit Manager. Their power resides in the fact that they control the formulary and determine the “preferred drugs” list. How does this relate to the uptake of biosimilars?
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Dr. Olga Petryna at EULAR2018 Discusses Pregnancy Outcomes with Secukinumab
Dr. Olga Petryna discusses a study presented at EULAR 2018 in Amsterdam on pregnancy outcomes with secukinumab.
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