Wednesday, 11 Dec 2019

Blog

Pearls Part 2: Common Sense Rheumatology 

We live in an era where you need evidence in order to believe, but life’s experiences should not be discounted even if we do not have the statistics to support them…yet. In Part 2 of my annual meeting Pearls Trilogy, I present ten tips and observations shared by Dr. Sterling West from his session, "Rheumatology Top Secrets & Pearls".

2021 E/M Coding Update

I had the pleasure of attending the CSRO legislative update while at #ACR19 and wanted to shed some light on one hot topic, the E/M coding from CMS and the 2021 update.

Improving the ACR – Big Meeting Experience

Our experts say you should: Plan the night before, use the ACR meeting App, work in groups, be involved in social media and, have fun! What's your advice on how to best attend the ACR meeting?

Rheum For Interpretation: Three Tips To Apply RCTs To Your Clinical Practice

At the 2019 meeting, almost 500 presentations discussed new randomized controlled trials. We are lucky to have so much research activity in our field, but applying an RCT to your daily practice can be challenging. Here are three tips to supercharge your critical appraisal!

A Review of the Review Course + How to Make the Information Stick

I have been attending the ACR Review Course for more than a decade, and it seems every year it gets better and better. Contrary to what most people think, this is not a board review course; it is more of a review of the latest research delivered by experts condensing rheumatology in eight hours.

When Classification And Diagnosis Diverge

Few rheumatologic diseases have diagnostic criteria, so clinicians often rely on classification criteria to diagnose patients in clinic. Because classification criteria were not designed to be used for these purposes, they have important limitations.

Should we all be Tweetiatricians?

The evidence base is currently lacking on whether the use of social media can improve patient outcomes. The reality is that individual doctors and medical organizations have to consciously decide if, why and how to use the various social media platforms.

Life Hacks for People with Arthritis

Since moving to South Florida (also popularly known as "God's Waiting Room" by the locals). I've learned a lot more about Lipstick Rheumatology. This moniker was made famous by my friend and colleague, Dr. Kathryn Dao, who first wrote about the nuances of being a female with rheumatic disease. This blog focuses on three popular products recommended by my female patients that serve as life improving hacks.

Of Plumbers and Doctors

A water pipe in my house broke, and I had to call for emergency plumbing service. The next day I went to the hospital, where I was on my two weeks of General Medicine inpatient attending. An elderly man was admitted, cared for, and following this patient's successful hospital discharge several days later, something occurred to me.

Clinic Exorcisms

After a few clinic no-shows, our clinic partner discussions lapsed into a discussion of clinics, especially bad clinics. Amidst the cussing and discussing of clinic experience, my partner, Dr. Dao, threw out the phrase, “clinic exorcism”! What a great title for a different kind of blog. When clinic operations and operators are truly bad, who you gonna call? Not Clinic Busters. Think about clinic exorcisms designed to eradicate potentially hazardous patients, employees, partners or certain clinic practices.

FEAR: A Perception of Fact In Spite of the Fiction

How do you help your patients who are resistant to your medical recommendations when they are receiving biased information from friends, family, and the internet? I wanted to share with you two cases and my approach.

Millennial Medicine and Patient Care

While often seen as demanding, millennial patients have grown accustomed to having direct access to everything and everyone. They tend to be more involved in the clinical evaluation in the office, more concerned about the social aspects of the disease, and are more frustrated with the varying shades of gray in diagnoses and delayed treatment efficacy. What does this mean for you and your practice?