Thursday, 17 Oct 2019

You are here

CAM Use is Common in Psoriasis

The July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology reports that patients with psoriasis are frequent users of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) largely because of disatisfaction with traditional medications.

The National Psoriasis Foundation commissioned a survey of patients on CAMs use and patients' perceptions.

The survey was sent to 100,927 NPF members and 219 completed it.

Of the respondents, 39.5% reported using complementary therapies and 41% reported using alternative therapies, with higher utilization among those with perceived severe psoriasis.

The most common reasons for using CAMs were that traditional medications did not help or had side effects.

CAM use differed by gender, with more men \using vitamins (24% vs 19%), Dead Sea bath salts (17% vs 8%), and cupping (3% vs 0.8%). More women than men used herbals/botanicals (17% vs 14%) and yoga (9.6% vs 2%) (P = .017).

Lastly, patients with moderate psoriasis by body surface area were more likely to recommend CAMs than those with mild or severe psoriasis (52.4% moderate vs 35.0% mild, 40.4% severe; P = .005).

CAM use was seldom driven by limited care access.

There appears to be a need for educational initiatives that enable physicians to discuss CAM use with psoriasis patients.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Comorbidity Worsens Axial Spondyloarthritis

Comorbidities are common in patients with axial spondyloarthropathy (axSpA), and a recent study has shown that multimorbidity, the coexistence of 2 or more conditions, is associated with more severe disease than those without comorbidities.

One-Third of Psoriatic Arthritis Patients Will Need Joint Surgery

Dannish study has shown that one-third of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) will have joint surgery that that PsA patients have twice the rate of joint surgery when compared with the general population.

The Danish National Patient Registry was used in this cohort study of incident PsA patients and their future risk of joint surgery compared to a general population cohort (GPC) between 1995-2012).

FUTURE 5 - Secukinumab and Less Radiographic Progression in Psoriatic Arthritis

The FUTURE 5 trial studied the effect of secukinumab (SEC) on radiographic progression through 52 weeks in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and found that SEC was clinically and radiographically superior to placebo (PBO). Patients received s.c. secukinumab 300 mg load (300 mg), 150 mg load (150 mg), 150 mg no load regimens or placebo at baseline, at weeks 1, 2 and 3 and every 4 weeks starting at week 4. The majority (87%) of patients enrolled at baseline remained in the study for 52 weeks.

Ixekizumab vs. Adalimumab in Psoriatic Arthritis

The Annals of Rheumatic Disease reports a psoriatic arthritis study where in ixekizumab was non-inferior to adalimumab for achievement of ACR50 responses but was superior to adalimumab for achievement of PASI100 by week 24.

NSAID Use Linked With Hypertension in Ankylosing Spondylitis

Continuous use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was associated with the development of incident hypertension, a prospective cohort study found.