Wednesday, 15 Aug 2018

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Erectile Dysfunction in Gout

The Journal of Rheumatology reports a population-based study demonstrating that gout is associated with an increased risk of developing erectile dysfunction (ED) suggesting that hyperuricemia and inflammation may be independent risk factors for ED.

Using an electronic medical record database in the United Kingdom, researchers did a matched cohort study comparing up to 5 control individuals (without gout) to each case of incident gout.  

They compared 38,438 gout patients (mean age 63.6 yrs) against 154,332 individuals without gout and found a higher rate of new ED cases in gout patients (11.9 vs 10.5 per 1000 person-years) compared to controls.

This translates to a roughly 15% increased risk of ED in gout patients.  The risk was even higher (31%) if the analysis was restricted to only gout patients receiving anti-gout treatment (n = 27,718).

The mechanisms by which gout or it's therapies could augment the risk of ED is not addressed by this population analyses. .

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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