Wednesday, 17 Oct 2018

You are here

FDA Approves Denosumab for Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

Amgen announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of Prolia® (denosumab) for the treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) in men and women at high risk of fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

This approval is based on data from a Phase 3 study which showed patients on glucocorticoid therapy who received Prolia had greater gains in bone mineral density (BMD) compared to those who received active comparator (risedronate).  This also follows an EU CHMP recommendation last month calling for the approval of denosumab for use in GIOP.

"Patients on long-term systemic glucocorticoid medications can experience a rapid reduction in bone mineral density within a few months of beginning treatment1," said study lead Kenneth F. Saag, M.D., M.Sc., Professor of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. "With this approval, patients who receive treatment with glucocorticoids now have a new option to help improve their bone mineral density."

The approval is supported by the 12-month primary analysis of a 24-month Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled study evaluating the safety and efficacy of Prolia 60 mg subcutaneously every six months compared with oral risedronate 5 mg once daily in 795 patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment, greater than or equal to 7.5 mg/day oral prednisone (or equivalent).

The study included two patient groups: a glucocorticoid-initiating subpopulation, receiving treatment for less than three months prior to study enrollment and planning to continue treatment for a total of at least six months, and a glucocorticoid-continuing subpopulation, receiving treatment for greater than or equal to three months prior to study enrollment and planning to continue treatment for a total of at least six months.

Study results showed that in the glucocorticoid-continuing subpopulation, Prolia demonstrated a significantly greater increase in lumbar spine BMD compared to risedronate at one year (3.8 percent versus 0.8 percent, respectively) with a treatment difference of 2.9 percent (p<0.001). Similarly, in the glucocorticoid-initiating subpopulation, denosumab demonstrated a significantly greater increase in lumbar spine BMD compared to risedronate at one year (4.4 percent versus 2.3 percent, respectively) with a treatment difference of 2.2 percent (p<0.001). Consistent effects on lumbar spine BMD were observed regardless of gender; race; geographic region; menopausal status; and baseline age, lumbar spine BMD T-score, and glucocorticoid dose within each subpopulation.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Vitamin D Fails to Improve Bone Health

The current edition of Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology suggests that neither vitamin D supplementation, nor dose, will improve bone density or prevent fractures in adults. (Citation source: https://buff.ly/2O9tqxI)

Zolendronic Acid Benefits Elder Women with Osteopenia

The NEJM reports that zolendronic acid was shown to significantly lower the risk of nonvertebral or vertebral fragility fractures in older women with osteopenia. 

Neuropathic Like Knee Pain

Fernandez and colleagues have shed further light on a significant subset of patients with knee pain - specifically, those with neuropathic like knee pain (NKP) that includes those with knee pain modified by central and peripheral neurologic dysfunction.

Knee Arthroscopic Surgeries on the Decline

A JAMA Internal Medicine report has shown that the rate of arthroscopic surgery has significantly declined, in an era when arthroplasty and the incidence of osteoarthritis (OA) has increased. (Citation source http://bit.ly/2DtpeUp)

Fractures May Lead to Systemic Bone Loss

Researchers at the University of California - Davis have shown that elderly women who had an upper body fracture or multiple fractures had more loss of hip density compared to those who who did not fracture. Systemic bone loss may increase the risk of future fractures.