Friday, 15 Feb 2019

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Fractures Augment 10 Year Mortality Risks

This nationwide study of adults (50+ yrs) from Denmark has shown that following a fragility fracture, the 10-years mortality risk was increased, especially in the first year following the fracture. 

A study of over 30,000 women and men followed for at least 10 years after an incident fragility fracture demonstrated excess mortality following all proximal and lower leg fractures. Most occurred in the first year and declined thereafter. (Citation source: bit.ly/2vbjQ1R)

Hip fractures had the highest excess mortality (33% higher in men and 20% higher in women) at one year post-fracture. One-year excess mortality was 20-25% after femur or pelvis, 10% following vertebral, 5-10% following humerus, rib or clavicle, and 3% following lower leg fractures.

These data show that mortality is not just limited to hip fractures. It was previously thought that mortality risk following fracture was primarily related to age, hip fractures or developing immobilization complications (e.g., pneumonia, thromoboses) associated with surgery or hospitalization. 

Thus a wide variety of fragility fractures may contribute to long-term excess mortality.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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