Friday, 20 Jul 2018

You are here

Half of Takayasu's Arteritis Relapse

A French retrospective study of 318 Takayasu's arteritis (TA) patients shows that 50% of patients will relapse and experience a vascular complication ≤10 years from diagnosis. 

A multicenter study examined 318 TA patients meeting both ACR and and Ishikawa criteria to assess event-free survival, relapse-free survival, vascular complications and risk factors for vascular complications.  At diagnosis, TA primarily affects younger (mean age 36 [25–47] years) women (86.8%).

With 6.1 years of follow-up, relapses were observed in 43%, vascular complications in 38%, and death in 5%.

Progressive disease course (P=0.018) and carotidynia (P=0.036) were independently associated with event-free survival.

Outomes observed:

 5 Year10 YearAssociations
Event-Free Survival48.2%36.4%Progressive disease course (P=0.018) and carotidynia (P=0.036)
Relapse-Free Survival58.6%47.7%Male sex (P=0.048), elevated C-reactive protein (P=0.013), and carotidynia (P=0.003)
Complication-Free Survival69.9%53.7%Progressive disease course (P=0.017), thoracic aorta involvement (P=0.009), and retinopathy (P=0.002)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusions: This nationwide study shows that 50% of patients with TA will relapse and experience a vascular complication ≤10 years from diagnosis. 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Baricitinib Effective in SLE Trial

Dan Wallace and colleagues report in Lancet the results of a phase II study of the selective baricitinib is an oral selective Janus kinase (JAK1 and JAK2) inhibitor, baricitinib in Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), demonstrating the efficacy and safety of JAK1/2 inhibition with baricitinib as a new potential oral therapy for SLE.

Nailfold Capillary Density Predicts Dermatomyositis Lung Involvement

In patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), an association was seen between low nailfold capillary density and pulmonary involvement, European researchers reported.

Systemic Sclerosis: More Common than Expected

Systemic sclerosis is more common in the United Kingdom than previously reported, a nationwide population-based study determined.

Best of 2017: Death Rates from Lupus Remain Disproportionately High

The Annals of Internal Medicine reports that despite improving trends in mortality, death rates from systematic lupus erythematosus (lupus) remain high compared to those in the general population, and disparities persist between subpopulations and geographic regions. Underreporting of lupus on death certificates may have resulted in underestimates of mortality rates. 

Best of 2017: Are ANA Tests Unreliable?

Pisetsky and colleagues have reported in the Annals of Rheumatic Disease that ANA tests done on established SLE patients may yield surprisingly disparate results.

While ANA negative lupus was a problem of old assays and the loss of ANA positivity may be seen with chronicity or age, most rheumatologists believe that ANA positivity is an absolute requirement for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus.