Friday, 16 Feb 2018

You are here

Joint Pain Linked to Increasing Temperature, Not Rainfall

Every rheumatologist knows and every rheumatic patient woes about the havoc weather inflicts on joint pains. Yet, research on this issue has seldom confirmed these impressions.  A novel new look has shown by linking online search terms with published weather conditions that increasing climate temperatures increased rates of hip and knee pain (searches), while precipitation had no effect.

Researchers explored this issue by linking online search terms and behavior (as a surrogate for patient symptomatology) with local weather data for temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and precipitation from 50 US metropolitan areas.

They found that for temperatures between -5°C and 30°C, search volumes for hip pain increased by 12 index points, and knee pain increased by 18 index points. Precipitation had a negative effect on search volumes for these terms. Higher temperatures >30°C, were linked with a modest reduction in arthritis related pain searches (-7 index points).  Such patterns were not observed with pain searches unrelated to the musculoskeletal system (e.g., stomach pain).

The authors postulated that these observations may be related to relative changes in physical activity levels associated with meteorological conditions.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Teriparatide Superior to Risedronate in the VERO Trial

Lancet reports that in a study teriparatide with risedronate, post-menopausal women with severe osteoporosis had significantly fewer new vertebral and clinical fractures on teriparatide comared to those receiving risedronate.

This trial is one of the first to compare osteoporosis drugs with incident fractures as the primary outcome.

Two Types of Osteoarthritis Based on Cartilage Studies

A report from Annals of Rheumatic Diseases suggests that osteoarthritis (OA) may be two distinct diseases based on genetic studies of articular cartilage. (Citation source: https://buff.ly/2mNtUsL).

RNA sequencing of knee cartilage from 44 OA patients undergoing total knee replacement was compared to 6 additional patients with OA and 10 control patients with non-OA.

New Rise in Hip Fractures Amongst Women

Reuters reports that the incidence of hip fractures in older women in the U.S. is rising after more than a decade of decline, according to a large new study of Medicare recipients.

Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements Do Not Reduce Hip Fractures

Recent JAMA study shows metanalysis of 33 clinical trials and 51,145 participants, showed that calcium, vitamin D, or both affords no decreased risk of hip fractures compared with placebo or no treatment and therefore questions their routine widespread use in the elderly.. 

Community Screening for Fracture Risk in Older Women is Effective and Feasible

A UK Study published in Lancet shows that community-based screening programme for fracture risk in older women is feasible, and may reduce hip fractures. 

Older women, age 70-85 yrs, were identified and participated in the trial and were assessed using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) with usual management. 12 483 were enrolled and 6233 women randomly assigned to the screening group.