Tuesday, 16 Oct 2018

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Opioid Overdoses Jump 30% in 2017

The CDC released new information yesterday showing that emergency department (ED) visits for opioid overdoses rose 30% in the US from July 2016 through September 2017; in addition, those with an overdose are more likely to a repeat overdose.

The data was presented as part of a new CDC “Vital Signs” report which describes recent trends in healthcare - with this report addressing opioid overdoses using emergency department data.

Highlights from this report and webinar include:

  • 30% Opioid overdoses went up 30% from July 2016 through September 2017 in 52 areas in 45 states.
  • 70% The Midwestern region witnessed opioid overdoses increase 70% from July 2016 through September 2017
  • 54% Opioid overdoses in large cities increased by 54% in 16 states.

The CDC report notes that these ED overdoses should be a call for action. Repeat overdoses may be prevented with medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorders. Coordinated action between EDs, health departments, mental health and treatment providers, community-based organizations, and law enforcement may curtail the rising rates of opioid overdose and death.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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