Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018

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Outcomes of Systemic Sclerosis Hospitalization

A study of inpatient systemic sclerosis (SSc) hospitalizations using the 2012–13 National Inpatient Sample database finds an inpatient mortality rate of 5%, and that infection was the most common cause of SSc hospitalizations and in-hospital death.

Researchers from Pennsylvania calculated rates of hospitalization, in-hospital mortality, LOS and hospital costs from 9731 SSc hospitalizations; a sample from an estimated 48 655 nationwide SSc hospitalizations.

Hospitalized patients were predominantly older (63.2 years), female (82.2%) and Caucasian (71.5%).

Infection was the most common cause for SSc hospitalizations (17.4%) and for those who died (32.7%).

Hospital mortality was also associated with acute renal failure (aOR = 4.3, 95% CI: 3.3, 5.60 and aspiration (aOR= 3.5, 95% CI: 2.5, 4.9).

While the median length of stay (LOS) was 4 days, this was significantly prolonged by pulmonary fibrosis, and myositis, infection, acute renal failure, acute bowel obstruction and aspiration (aOR > 2.0 with P < 0.0001).

Higher cost of hospitalization  was predicted by acute renal failure, acute bowel obstruction, and aspiration.

SSc patients are at risk for significant morbidity and mortality, especially if hospitalized with infection or other complications of SSc.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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