Friday, 25 May 2018

You are here

Potential Reasons Why Osteoarthritis Preferentially Affects Women

Researchers from Augusta University have examined exosomes from patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) to enhance our molecular understanding of the pathogenesis of OA. (Citation source http://buff.ly/2tuDZ3v)

Exosomes play a vital role in cell-to-cell communication. By obtaining samples from OA patient synovial fluid, researchers analyzed the exosomes that carry microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Their supposition was that molecular profiling of synovial fluid derived exosomal miRNAs may increase the understanding of OA progression.

They found distinct differences in miRNA activity between men and women with OA.  Interesting, in light of the fact that OA is more common in women than men; the reasons for which are unknown.

The synovial fluid of men showed 69 downregulated and 45 upregulated miRNAs, while in women there were 91 downregulated and 53 upregulated miRNAs.

Women were more likely than men to show a deactivation or alteration of miRNAs that are important for estrogen signaling and collagen production.

Thus the loss of estrogen levels during menopausal years may be associated with an increased risk of OA. It has been previously noted that women on hormone replacement therapy have a lower risk of OA.

One potential use of this stems from their efforts showing that blocking estrogen availability in exosomes using aromatase inhibitors may lead to a reduction in miRNAs.

The study also disclosed that one particular miRNA, called MiR-504-3p, was upregulated in both men and women with OA. The significance of this is unknown but may related to cartilage degeneration. 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Restless Sleep and Inactivity Intertwined in OA

Adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee who frequently experienced restless sleep were less likely to engage in potentially beneficial moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative found.

FDA Approves Denosumab for Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

Amgen announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of Prolia® (denosumab) for the treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) in men and women at high risk of fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

Bisphosphonate Drug Holidays May Result in Fractures

A report in Endocrine Practice shows that drug holidays from bisphosphonates results in a 15% risk of fractures.  (Citation source: http://bit.ly/2FHbFwp)

USPSTF Recommendations on Vitamin D, Calcium Supplementation to Prevent Fractures

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes current scientific evidence is insufficient regarding the use of vitamin D and calcium, alone or in combination, to prevent fractures in men and premenopausal women. The USPSTF recommends against daily supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D and 1,000 mg or less of calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women. Current scientific evidence is insufficient regarding the use of vitamin D and calcium at doses greater than 400 IU of vitamin D and greater than 1,000 mg of calcium in postmenopausal women.

Obesity Surgery Tames Knee OA Pain

Laparoscopic gastric band (LAGB) surgery was associated with significant decreases in knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA), with the greatest improvements seen among those whose body mass index (BMI) had the greatest decreases and among younger patients, researchers reported.