Friday, 21 Sep 2018

You are here

Prevalence of Arthritis Grossly Underestimated

Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine have published a new report showing that arthritis affected 91 million adults in the US in 2015 or 37% of the poplulation. Their prevalence estimate is 68% higher than previously reported arthritis national estimates. (Citation source: https://buff.ly/2hWzUxf+)

Prior national estimates of arthritis rely on a single survey question, asking the patient if they have ever been told they have arthritis by a health professional. Jafarzadeh and Felson took this a step further to assess prevalence based on a combination of factors - doctor-diagnosed arthritis, chronic joint symptoms, and whether symptom duration exceeded three months.

They analyzed 33,672 participants in the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and found that arthritis affects a much higher percentage of the US adult population, particularly underestimating arthritis in younger adults (<65 years old).

19.3 percent of men and 16.7 percent of women age18-64 years reported joint symptoms without a concurrent report of a doctor-diagnosed arthritis. For participants 65 years of age and older, the respective proportions were 15.7 percent and 13.5 percent.

 

Men

<65yrs

Women

<65 yrs

Men

>65yrs

Women

>65yrs

Joint Sxs

(with "arthritis" Dx

19.3%16.7%15.7%13.5%
"Arthritis" Dx by MD29.9%31.2%55.8%68.7%

 

The authors suggest that current arthritis surveillance methods should be revised to correct for inherent limitations and to increase accuracy.

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Maastricht Study Links Dairy Intake to Osteoarthritis

The Maastricht study explored the potential association between dairy consumption and knee osteoarthritis (OA), and found that higher intake of full-fat dairy and Dutch cheese - but not milk - was significantly associated with the lower risk of knee OA.

Osteoarthritis and the Risk of Mortality

Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 27 million Americans but its affect on mortality is uncertain. A recent study shows that while self-reported OA does not increase mortality, radiographic OA of the knee (RKOA) is associated with higher mortality related to CVD, diabetes and renal disease.

2018 EULAR Recommendations for Hand Osteoarthritis Care

The uropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) has previously put forth recommendations for management of hand osteoarthritis (OA) in 2007. But since then, advances and further evidence have emerged.

An international panel of 19 physicians, healthcare professionals and patients from 10 European countries formulated five overarching principles and 10 new recommendations after a systematic literature review was performed.

Persistent Osteoporosis Drug Use Pays Off

Among elderly female Medicare patients, persistent use of osteoporosis medications was associated with reduced risk of fracture and significantly lower total health care costs.

Osteoporosis International reports the results of research examining records of 294,369 women >65 years old, on Medicare and taking osteoporosis medicines for the first time at some point between 2009 and 2011. (Citation Source: bit.ly/2vALm98) 

Fractures Augment 10 Year Mortality Risks

This nationwide study of adults (50+ yrs) from Denmark has shown that following a fragility fracture, the 10-years mortality risk was increased, especially in the first year following the fracture.