Wednesday, 12 Dec 2018

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Rheumatology Physician Burnout and Depression

The 2018 Medscape Physician Burnout and Depression report shows that 42% of physician respondents report "burnout" and up to 15% experience some sort of depression. (Citation source https://buff.ly/2DJ5uJ0)

In a survey of 15,543 doctors from 29 specialties, they found highest burnout rates in critical care and neurologists (48%), family medicine (47%), ob/gyns and internists (46%). Lowest rates were seen in pathology and dermatology (32%), and plastic surgery (23%). 

Rheumatologists burnout was amongst the lowest of medical subspecialties (38%).  Only 10% of rheumatologists said they were burned out and depressed (the average was 14%). Rheumatologists ranked in the middle of "being happy at work" (27%).

For the depressed, nearly one-third said they were more easily exasperated by patients, less engaged with their patients; and were less friendly,

Nearly 15 percent of depressed doctors said their depression might cause them to make errors they wouldn’t ordinarily make, while 5 percent said depression led them to make errors that might have harmed patients.

Physician burnout and depression are driven largely by bureaucratic and practice demands (56%), too many hours (39%), lack of respect (26%) and increasing computerization (24%). 

Unfortunately, solutions for physician burnout are limited.  Only 45% of hospital-based doctors and 31% of office-based multispeciality practices or outpatient clinics have burnout prevention programs.

 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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