Tuesday, 22 Oct 2019

You are here

Severe Obesity Worsens Disability in Rheumatoid Arthritis

A study from the Veterans Affairs clinics and the National Data Bank of Rheumatic Diseases shows that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who were severely obese had a greater risk of progressive disability compared to overweight patients; that was not explained by their arthritis or inflammation.  (Citation source: http://bit.ly/2FuvYNM)

This study included RA patients from NDB (N=23,323) and the Veterans Administration RA (VARA) registry study (N=1,697).

Disability scores were higher among severely obese patients compared to overweight patients. Unintentional weight loss following enrollment was associated with a greater risk of worsening disability, possibly explained by aging and frailty.

Weight loss can be managed and be used to prospectively improve quality of life. However, unintentional weight loss is a poor prognostic sign for disability, especially as patients age. 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Comorbidities Increase in Importance in RA

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a large comorbidity burden at the time of diagnosis, including a wide range of ailments but with pulmonary disease a particular concern, a U.K. population-based study found.

Stress and the Risk of Incident Inflammatory Arthritis

A prospective analysis of newly diagnosed, inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients suggests that perceived distress (stress) increases the odds of incident IA.

Juvenile Arthritis at Risk for Coronary Artery Disease

Arthritis Care & Research reports that juvenile arthritis (JA) patients may have a higher risk if coronary artery disease (CAD) in adulthood. 

Data was drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination (2007‐2014).  The diagnoses of JA and CAD were self declared by respondents.

Long Delays for Inflammatory Arthritis Patients

The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society's (NRAS) annual audit has identified significant treatment delays for patients with suspected early inflammatory arthritis could result in unnecessary harm. 

Antibiotics Increase Rheumatoid Risk - Again

Another UK study has suggested that prior use of antibiotics increases the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Rheumatology has published a 15 year case–control study that compared 8482 newly diagnosed RA patients and 22,661 controls from the UK’s Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database (between 2006 and 2018).