Monday, 24 Feb 2020

You are here

Spinal Manipulation Equal to NSAIDS for Acute Low Back Pain

JAMA has published a review of 15 RCTs (1711 patients) analyzing the role of spinal manipulation therapy in patients with acute low back pain. The authors found modest improvements in pain and function at up to 6 weeks, with temporary minor musculoskeletal harms.

Back pain is among the most common symptoms prompting patients to seek care. Lifetime prevalence estimates of low back pain exceed 50 percent. Treatments for acute back pain include analgesics, muscle relaxants, exercises, physical therapy, heat, spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and others, with none established as superior to others. Paul G. Shekelle, M.D., Ph.D., of the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Los Angeles, and colleagues conducted a review and meta-analysis of previous studies to assess the effectiveness and harms associated with spinal manipulation compared with other nonmanipulative therapies for adults with acute (six weeks or less) low back pain.

Of 26 eligible randomized clinical trials (RCTs) identified, 15 RCTs (1,711 patients) provided moderate-quality evidence that SMT has a statistically significant association with improvements in pain. Twelve RCTs (1,381 patients) produced moderate-quality evidence that SMT has a statistically significant association with improvements in function. No RCT reported any serious adverse event. Minor transient adverse events such as increased pain, muscle stiffness, and headache were reported 50 percent to 67 percent of the time in large case series of patients treated with SMT. Heterogeneity (differences) in study results was large, and was not explained by type of clinician performing SMT, type of manipulation, study quality, or whether SMT was given alone or as part of a package of therapies.

The authors write that the size of the benefit of SMT for acute low back pain is about the same as the benefit from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to the Cochrane review on this topic.

 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Rheumatologists' Comments

No surprise. Many of these patients will improve regardless of treatment or lack thereof UNLESS there are psychosocial "drivers". Time and placebo remain effective therapies unless the patient's perception of the meaning of the pain results in pain behavior. Many people live paycheck to paycheck and need a "quick fix" to get back to their life responsibilities and obligations. Activity modification or decreased income are not options for such patients.

More Like This

Half of Opioids Rx Come from 1% of MDs

The BMJ reports that while most US providers are cautious in their prescribing, half of opioid prescriptions are written by 1% of providers.

Between 2003 and 2017, there was an annual average of 669495 providers prescribing 8.9 million opioid prescriptions.

In 2017, 1% of providers accounted for 49% of all opioid doses and 27% of all opioid prescriptions; that's nearly 1000 times more than the middle 1% of prescribers.

Domestic Abuse Linked to Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue

Domestic violence was found to predispose to a higher risk of fibromyalgia and those developing chronic fatigue syndrome.

Researchers studied the association between intimate partner violence (IPV) with fibromyalgia and CFS, using a retrospective open cohort design of patients entered into the “The Heath Improvement Network” database between 1995 and 2017.

A Potential Biomarker for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome affects at least 2 million people in the United States and bears tremendous overlap with fibromyalgia - both being difficult to diagnosis because the symptom complex is often unrecognized and these conditions have no biomarker test. 

NIH Conference Review of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The current issue of JAMA reviews recent advances on chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis/(ME/CFS), based on a 2-day conference held at the NIH in an April 2019. The NIH 2-day conference reviewed recent progress and new research in several areas described below.

Study Looks at Opioid Use After Knee Surgery

A small study looked at whether reducing the number of opioid tablets prescribed after knee surgery would reduce postoperative use and if preoperative opioid-use education would reduce it even more.