Monday, 28 May 2018

You are here

Two Types of Osteoarthritis Based on Cartilage Studies

A report from Annals of Rheumatic Diseases suggests that osteoarthritis (OA) may be two distinct diseases based on genetic studies of articular cartilage. (Citation source: https://buff.ly/2mNtUsL).

RNA sequencing of knee cartilage from 44 OA patients undergoing total knee replacement was compared to 6 additional patients with OA and 10 control patients with non-OA.

Unsupervised clustering identified two distinct OA groups: Group A with 24 patients (55%) and Group B with 18 patients (41%). These results were further validated by RT-qPCR in 16 further patients with OA.

Between group differences were found in complement activation, innate immune responses and altered Wnt and TGFβ signalling, but not for inflammatory cytokine expression.

Matrix changes in Group A were chondrogenic, in Group B they were non-chondrogenic with changes in mechanoreceptors, calcium signalling, ion channels and in cytoskeletal organisers. The gene expression changes predicted 478 potential biomarkers for detection in synovial fluid to distinguish patients from the two groups.

It is postulated that variations between these two categories of OA could be used to predict different responses to treatment, and may explain why treating osteoarthritis as a single condition has proven unproductive.

 

 

 

Disclosures: 
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

Add new comment

More Like This

Restless Sleep and Inactivity Intertwined in OA

Adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee who frequently experienced restless sleep were less likely to engage in potentially beneficial moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative found.

FDA Approves Denosumab for Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

Amgen announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of Prolia® (denosumab) for the treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) in men and women at high risk of fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

Bisphosphonate Drug Holidays May Result in Fractures

A report in Endocrine Practice shows that drug holidays from bisphosphonates results in a 15% risk of fractures.  (Citation source: http://bit.ly/2FHbFwp)

USPSTF Recommendations on Vitamin D, Calcium Supplementation to Prevent Fractures

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes current scientific evidence is insufficient regarding the use of vitamin D and calcium, alone or in combination, to prevent fractures in men and premenopausal women. The USPSTF recommends against daily supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D and 1,000 mg or less of calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women. Current scientific evidence is insufficient regarding the use of vitamin D and calcium at doses greater than 400 IU of vitamin D and greater than 1,000 mg of calcium in postmenopausal women.

Obesity Surgery Tames Knee OA Pain

Laparoscopic gastric band (LAGB) surgery was associated with significant decreases in knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA), with the greatest improvements seen among those whose body mass index (BMI) had the greatest decreases and among younger patients, researchers reported.