Tuesday, 20 Aug 2019

News

Biologic Therapy Improves Psoriasis and Reduces CV Inflammation

Psoriasis confers a significant risk of comorbidity, but is psoriasis associated with increased coronary inflammation and is this risk attenuated by biologic therapy? JAMA Cardiology has published a cohort study of 134 consecutive patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, showing that biologic therapy was associated with a significant decrease in coronary inflammation as assessed by perivascular fat attenuation index, a marker of coronary inflammation associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Patients not receiving biologic therapy had no change in perivascular fat attenuation index at 1 year.

TNF Inhibitor and Biologic Induced Psoriasis

Analysis of RA patients in the German biologics register, RABBIT, shows an increased risk of psoriasis with TNF inhibitor (TNFi) compared to csDMARDs and other non-TNFi biologics. 

Among RABBIT RA patients without (n = 14,525) or with a history of psoriasis (n = 375) they assessed the risk of incident psoriasis or flare according to what biologic or csDMARD taken.

Top Rheumatology Centers Led by Johns Hopkins

Medscape has reported the results of the US News & World Report's annual ranking of the best adult rheumatology hospitals nationwide has again honored Johns Hopkins Hospital, with runner up status going to the Cleveland Clinic, Hospital for Special Surgery, NewYork-Presbyterian University of Columbia, and Cornell. 

These results are based on surveys of US rheumatology specialists responding to US News surveys.

Joint Surgery Rates Remain High in Psoriatic Arthritis

The incidence rate of joint surgery among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has remained persistently high, double that of the general population, according to a new Danish cohort study.

War on RA - Part 2: It's All About You

Part II of this series is a direct message to rheumatologists. If we’re doing such a great job in RA, then why do we need a war on RA? Why is this conflict being laid at the feet of good soldier rheumatologists, those who toil daily at winning therapeutic battles one patient at a time? The reasons are blunt and true.

Abatacept Disappoints in Systemic Sclerosis

A 12‐month, Phase 2 trial has shown that subcutaneous abatacept was well tolerated in patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc), but failed to significantly change the skin outcomes as measured by the change in modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS)

RheumNow Podcast – FDA Hyperactivity (7.26.19)

Dr. Jack Cush reviews the news, journal reports, and FDA releases and deliberations covered this past week on RheumNow.com

Tofacitinib Gets a New Boxed Warning for Blood Clots and Death with Higher Doses

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved new warnings about an increased risk of blood clots and of death with the 10 mg twice daily dose of tofacitinib (Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR), which is used in patients with ulcerative colitis. 

Efficacy of Maintaining or Switching to Baricitinib Monotherapy

A post hoc analysis of baricitinib use in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients shows that while many patients respond well to baricitinib monotherapy or to switching to baricitinib monotherapy, those with less disease control respond well to the addition of methotrexate (MTX) to baricitinb.  

FDA AAC Splits Vote in Favor of Nintedanib for Scleroderma Interstitial Lung Disease

The FDA convened Arthritis Advisory Committee to consider nintedanib for the treatment of systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) and voted 10-7 in favor of approving the drug for this new indication.

FINCH2: Filgotinib in Biologic Refractory Rheumatoid Arthritis

The FINCH2 study has shown that filgotinib, an oral once daily JAK 1 inhibitor, is highly effective in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who failed to respond to prior biologic therapy.

Risk of Major Gastrointestinal Bleeding With New vs Conventional Oral Anticoagulants

The comparative risk for gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) was compared to vitamin K antagonists or anti-platelet agents in a recent metanalysis, which showed no significant difference in major GIB events between these agents.