Thursday, 24 Aug 2017

News

Marijuana Has Little Effect on Most Types of Pain

Cannabis has become a regulated product, and many states have made it available with the intent of treating a variety of medical disorders, including chronic pain. A metanalysis published in Annals of Internal Medicine has shown that while cannabis may help neuropathic pain, it is not proven to benefit other types of chronic pain.

Duration of Azathioprine Maintenance in AAV Does Not Alter Relapse Rates

A European multicentre study examined whether the duration of azathioprine (AZA) maintenance therapy in ANCA-associated vasculitis patients would influence the relapse rate during long-term follow-up.

Psoriatic Arthritis Patients with Comorbidities have Worse Disease and Poor Responses

A population-based cohort study shows that comorbidities in psoriatic arthritis patients (PsA) were associated with higher disease activity, shorter persistence and reduced clinical response to TNF inhibitors (TNFi). 

Uveitis Events Reduced with Select TNF Inhibitors

Uveitis may occur in up to 40% of spondyloarthritis patients. Metanalyses have shown that treatment with tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor may reduce the rates of anterior uveitis. A multicenter study from Sweden and Norway has confirmed that amongst TNFi, adalimumab and infliximab offer better protection against AU than etanercept.

Kids with Crohn's have Profound MSK Deficits - but No Increase in Fractures

Crohn’s disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract, is also known for its propensity to affect the musculoskeletal system. Extraintestinal complications of CD include inflammatory polyarthritis, loss of muscle mass, growth retardation and vertebral compression fractures. Some of these are direct results of inflammation or indirect effects of malnutrition.

The RheumNow Week in Review – 11 August 2017

The RheumNow Week in Review caps the week's news every Friday. Dr Jack Cush reviews the news, journal reports and important events from the past week in rheumatology.  This week's news highlights include new data on the incidence of arthritis, lag times in patient referral, criteria for referral and why/how weather change affects arthritis pain.

Joint Pain Linked to Increasing Temperature, Not Rainfall

Every rheumatologist knows and every rheumatic patient woes about the havoc weather inflicts on joint pains. Yet, research on this issue has seldom confirmed these impressions.  A novel new look has shown by linking online search terms with published weather conditions that increasing climate temperatures increased rates of hip and knee pain (searches), while precipitation had no effect.

Criteria for Early Referrals from Primary Care

Early diagnosis and early intervention has been the mantra of all who manage musculoskeletal (MSK) diseases for decades. While the rules for referral may be clear to some, the lack of uniformity and promotion amongst primary care providers is less certain.

JIA Worsens Quality of Life Long into Adulthood

Adult patients with a history of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) showed poorer health-related quality of life decades later, compared with individuals who were healthy as children -- even if they were in clinical remission, reported researchers in Norway.

Mycophenolate and Steroids in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

Beyond diagnosis, management of neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE) can be challenging. Moreover, there are scant studies addressing optimal management. In this issue of Clinical Rheumatology, researchers show the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and deflazacort in NPSLE.

Therapeutic Update: 5 Questions on Sirukumab FDA Hearing

Drs. Cush and Gibofsky answer 5 questions about the August 2, 2017 FDA Arthritis Advisory Committee meeting that reviewed the NDA for sirukumab use in rheumatoid arthritis. The panel voted against (1-12) the approval of sirukumab.

MSK Ultrasound Now Standard for Rheumatology Training

In the United States, musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) in rheumatology has grown significantly in the last few decades. Ten years ago, more than half of rheumatology fellows had training or exposure to MSUS. A current survey of training programs shows that 94% provide MSUS training.