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Modifiable Risk Factors for Hyperuricemia

Sep 05, 2019 4:48 pm

Choi and colleagues have shown that four modifiable risk factors (BMI, the DASH diet, alcohol use, and diuretic use) could individually account for a notable proportion of observed hyperuricemia. 

Researchers examine modifiable risk factors for hyperuricemia and how this could be prevented through risk factor modification in the general population.

Data from 14,624 adults representative of the non-institutionalized civilian US population, they calculated adjusted prevalence for hyperuricemia and its relationship with modifiable risk factors. 

They found that BMI, alcohol intake, adherence to a DASH-style diet, and diuretic use were all associated with serum urate levels and the presence of hyperuricemia in a dose-response manner. 

The attributable risk(PAR) of hyperuricemia was shown for:

  • overweight/obesity (prevalence, 60%) - PAR 44% (95% CI, 41 to 48%)
  • non-adherence to a DASH-style diet (prevalence, 82%) - PAR 9% (3% to 16%)
  • alcohol use (prevalence, 48%) - PAR 8% (5% to 11%
  • diuretic use (prevalence, 8%) - PAR 12% (11% to 14%)

It appears these four modifiable risk factors (BMI, the DASH diet, alcohol use, and diuretic use) could individually account for a notable proportion of hyperuricemia cases.  However, the corresponding serum urate variance explained by these risk factors was very small and paradoxically masked their high prevalences.

Disclosures
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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