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Selective Use of HLA-B*5801 Testing in Gout

Aug 07, 2018 4:13 pm

The current edition of JAMA Internal Medicine describes an Asian gout patient who presents with an allopurinol hypersensitivity reaction that could have been diagnosed by testing for HLA-B*5801.

The patient was an elderly Asian male with chronic stage 3 kidney disease, gout, and hypertension. He was prescibed allopurinol (300 mg daily) and colchicine, 0.6 mg daily for acute gout attacks and then a month later presented with acute fever of  102.3°F, myalgia, maculopapular rash over the trunk and arms and laboratory evidence of leukopenia, mild eosinophilia and elevated hepatic enzymes (ALT 308 U/L and AST 248 U/L). 

Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) was suspected and allopurinol was discontinued; testing was positive for HLA-B*5801.  He had a complicated course requiring more than 2 months in the hospital.

The allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome is rare (1 in 1000) and manifests with severe cutaneous reactions that may present as DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, etc. 

While HLA-B*5801 is found in 6-12% of certain Asian populations, it is very uncommon in whites (

HLA-B*5801 is very prevalent in the Han Chinese, Thai, and Korean people.  In this instance, predictive association between this allele and allopurinol hypersensitivity is very high (Hazard Ration ~ 100) suggesting its testing would be appropriate prior to prescribing allopurinol in certain asian populations. Finding HLA-B*5801 positivity is an indication for urate lowering therapy other than allopurinol.

 

Disclosures
The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose related to this subject

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